Events

Volunteer Opportunities

We've had excellent response from the TU and local Grand County community to our previous volunteer opportunities. At TU we are incredibly greatful for your support, help and concern for our environment. No additional volunteers are need based on our current (August 11, 2018) schedule, but keep checking this space. We haven't scheduled any 2019 projects yet, but now that we're past our Banquet we'll begin our planning. Please let a Board Member know if you have ideas for future TU projects.

Volunteer Opportunities

High School Bug Field Trip Volunteers Thursday September 27

Please volunteer for GCWIN’s annual High School Bug Week field trip on Thursday, September 27th, 2018.  We’ll have close to 90 students participating so we need your help and expertise to pull off this awesome environmental education program.  For those of you that aren’t familiar with the program, High School Bug Week began in 2010 as a way to immerse students in watershed science and develop their appreciation for the Headwaters of the Colorado River, which happens to be in our backyard!  I hope you are able to join us this year because each one of you brings a different but thought-provoking perspective to the program.  If you can’t attend but know someone who would appreciate the volunteer opportunity please send them my way.  We’ll provide all the necessary information so that your day is successful and fun, plus we provide all our volunteers with lunch.  If you have any questions I’d love to hear from you!  Thank you for your time.
   Contact Kayli Foulk, Executive Director Grand County Water Information Network  Office: 970-627-8162  Mobile: 814-720-7353

 

Keep checking here for details and to signup opportunities for other events.. 

Greenback Cutthroat Recovery Program October 4

Join us  6-7PM on October 4 at the Winter Park Pub to learn about current efforts to restore Colorado’s native cutthroat trout. The overall goal is to create a metapopulation of greenback cutthroat trout across approximately 37 miles of stream habitat and 106 acres of lake habitat in northcentral Colorado. To achieve this goal, 54 miles of connected streams will need to be treated to recover the 37 miles of greenback habitat.

Implementation is starting this year in Grand County and restoration work will be phased over 15 years, including designing, enhancing or constructing two permanent and three temporary non-native fish barriers; removing non-native fish such and brook and brown trout that compete for food and habitat; and stocking native lineage fish, protecting the habitat until isolated native populations have established.

Work is beginning with surveys and the construction of a fish barrier in Grand Ditch, and the application of piscicide in Parika Lake and Baker Gulch to remove non-native species. A portion of the work is being funded through a $1.25 million trust established following a negotiated settlement agreement between the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and Water Supply and Storage Company. Colorado Trout Unlimited is serving as the trustee. These projects will help create a stable, isolated population of Colorado’s threatened state fish – once thought to be extinct.

Come a little early and be sure to order snacks and beverages. The presentation by U.S. Forest Service Fisheries Biologist Matt Fairchild will begin at  6:00 and last about 15-20 minutes, followed by an opportunity to ask questions and socialize with other fish and river enthusiasts!

 

President's Letter 7/23/2018

CATCH AND RELEASE CAN MEAN CATCH AND KILL

The Colorado River Headwaters Chapter of Trout Unlimited applauds Colorado Parks and Wildlife for taking a stance on high stream temperatures that stress and can kill trout. We are experiencing one of the hottest, driest years in decades and with that we are experiencing stream temperatures that are too hot for the survival of trout. 

Trout are a cold water fish because cold water holds more dissolved oxygen which trout require. At stream temperature above 65 degrees F, enough dissolved oxygen can escape into the atmosphere to stress trout. At temperatures of 74 degrees F. trout can die. On the Fraser River the afternoon stream temperatures are reaching 74 degrees F and on tributaries to the Fraser River, afternoon stream temperatures are reaching 72.5. By 1:00 pm stream temperatures have warmed up to 65 degrees F or greater and both Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the Headwaters Chapter of TU recommend that fly fishers quit fishing. Above 65 degrees F trout are stressed. Even a savvy catch and release fly fisher can  easily kill a trout whose oxygen consumption soars when caught. 

The Headwaters Chapter of Trout Unlimited is asking all catch and release fishers to fish with a thermometer and stop fishing when stream temperatures reach 65 degrees F. If you don’t own a thermometer, you can purchase one at a local fly shop. Until you can obtain a thermometer you should use the 1:00 pm “Stop Fishing” recommendation from CPW. Based on recent stream temperature trends, our streams are reaching temperatures that stress trout on a daily basis by 1:00 pm. From 1:00 pm through the evening stream temperatures will remain high enough to stress trout. Give the fish a break. Fish streams in the morning and move to lakes in the afternoon.

The long term future of Grand County’s trout fishery depends on how we take care of our trout in drought years like the one that we are experiencing this summer. Treat the trout well and they will be around to enjoy and to create a healthy fishing economy for years to come. To learn more, go the the Headwaters Chapter website at www.coheadwaters.org.

   Kirk Klancke, President, Colorado river Headwaters Chapter of Trout Unlimited

 

Events Calendar

Today 
RadDatePicker
Open the calendar popup.
Locations:
select
SeptemberOctober 2018November
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
30
1
2
3
45
6
7
8
9
1011
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
1920
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10